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National Day of the Cowboy celebrated in county

LaGrange County celebrated the National Day of the Cowboy Saturday at David Rogers Memorial Park where there were cowboy traditions and events that were celebrated to remember who the cowboys of America were.

Scott Beam of the LaGrange County Parks and Recreation Department planned the local celebration of the National Day of the Cowboy featuring roping, dress-up, horseshoes, target practice, and other cowboy-oriented activities.

The celebration of the National Day of the Cowboy is something that the National Day of the Cowboy Corporation is trying to get passed by the government of each state in order to preserve the history of American cowboys and their way of life.

Their goal is to get the states to pass a bill for the recognition of the National Day of the Cowboy, which is the fourth Saturday in July.

The national representative of the National Day of the Cowboy Corporation, Bethany Braley, has been all over the United States talking to each state and their representatives, encouraging them to work toward officially recognizing the National Day of the Cowboy.

The goal of the National Day of the Cowboy is to preserve the heritage of American cowboys that is slowly fading away. Along with getting the holiday recognized, the National Day of the Cowboy Corporation is promoting literature, history, music, poetry, art, photography, and film to educate the public to who the cowboys were and what they did.

The Indiana Representative of the National Day of the Cowboy Corporation, Jerry Betley, was at the celebration on Saturday in LaGrange County. He shared the history of the organization and the importance of recognizing the cowboys and thought that a John Wayne quote said it all: “Every country in the world loved the folklore of the Old West – the music, the dress, the excitement, everything that was associated with the opening of a new territory. It took everybody out of their own little world. The cowboy lasted a hundred years, created more songs and prose and poetry than any other folk figure…Now I wonder who’ll continue it?”