Share |

History of the National Day of the Cowboy

The fourth Saturday in July, this Saturday, is a day that the National Day of the Cowboy Corporation is trying to get states to set aside as the National Day of the Cowboy to recognize and celebrate what the cowboy has contributed to America’s heritage.

The effort to get the National Day of the Cowboy proclaimed started in 2005 with a bill in the U. S. Senate to set aside the fourth Saturday of July for the National Day of the Cowboy. During that time, President George W. Bush supported the bill but didn’t get it signed into law. It is a bill that has been sponsored in the U.S. Senate every year since 2005.

To help with the effort to get the National Day of the Cowboy recognized, the National Day of the Cowboy Corporation decided to try and get support from the states to pass individual bills into law for each of the different states. They started this effort in 2009.

Earlier this year, Kansas was the eighth state to pass a permanent bill for the National Day of the Cowboy. The first state states were Wyoming and California in 2012 and then Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon and Mississippi followed in 2013.

There has been 24 states that have passed a resolution or a governor’s proclamation to support the National Day of the Cowboy, including Indiana.

The National Day of the Cowboy has been a subject talked about in Indiana since 2012. The executive director of the National Day of the Cowboy, Bethany Braley, started working with Senator Tom Wyss for support and he suggested a governor’s proclamation.

Since 2012 the National Day of the Cowboy has worked closely with Representatives Phyllis Pond, Tom Wyss, Ben Smaltz and John Waterman on bills that have not be able to make it out of the Senate and for governor’s proclamations.

An encouraging event for the effort to recognize the National Day of the Cowboy for Indiana was when the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis endorsed the National Day of the Cowboy in 2013 by flying a flag. The flag had been flown at the Allen County 4-H Fair and currently flies in 30 states and has also been to the moon.

There are many people and organizations in Indiana that are working to preserve the history of the cowboy and what the cowboys have done for America through western relations and agriculture including 4-H, the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), the Association of Christian Cowboys, Single Action Shooting Society, Cowboy Mounted Shooters and black powder groups.