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DNR grants to address invasive aquatic vegetation

 

Department of Natural Resources grants totaling more than $693,000 statewide will be used to fund the battle against invasive aquatic vegetation in Indiana’s lakes. LaGrange County is receiving nine grants, totaling $170,100.

Invasive vegetation management grants awarded for LaGrange County lakes were:

Adams Lake – $15,760 for aquatic vegetation management survey, plan and treatment.

Atwood Lake – $14,400 for aquatic vegetation management survey, plan and treatment.

Big Long Lake – $39,000 for aquatic vegetation management survey, plan and treatment.

Big Turkey and Henry lakes (LaGrange and Steuben counties) – $37,740 for aquatic vegetation management survey, plan and treatment.

Little Turkey Lake – $5,000 for aquatic vegetation management treatment.

Oliver, Olin and Martin lakes – $10,240 for aquatic vegetation management survey, plan and treatment.

Pretty Lake – $16,150 for aquatic vegetation management survey and plan.

Stone and Brokesha lakes – $19,630 for aquatic vegetation management survey, plan and treatment.

Wall Lake – $12,180 for aquatic vegetation management survey, plan and treatment.

Across Indiana, the 37 projects involve 53 lakes in 14 counties. They were selected from a number of applications submitted by local sponsors who commit to sharing a portion of the total cost. DNR's portion comes from the LARE fee paid annually by boat owners to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. The grants allow for the completion of projects that would be difficult for local organizations to fund on their own.

“We are pleased to partner with local sponsors in supporting these projects to improve aquatic habitat and enhance recreational opportunities for boating and fishing,” said Mark Reiter, director of DNR Fish and Wildlife.

The projects also provide economic benefits to the associated lake communities by offering increased opportunities for those who fish or pleasure-boat. LARE is a user-funded program in which those who boat help support the efforts to improve and enhance the lakes. Lake users will benefit from efforts to control or manage non-native invasive species such as Eurasian watermilfoil, curly-leaf pondweed, and starry stonewort.